Toxic Art Histories

08.11.-09.11.2019, Workshop, Berlin

A workshop organised by the International Research Group ›Bilderfahrzeuge‹
Cluster of Excellence ›Matters of Activity‹,  Zentrallabor, Sophienstraße 22a, 10178 Berlin 

FRIDAY, 8TH NOVEMBER 2019 

I. NATIONAL TOXICITIES
 
13:30 Welcome & Introduction: Andreas Beyer (Basel)

Opening Lecture
13:45 Eric Michaud (Paris)  The Poison of Self-Mimesis: from the Individual to the Group,   from Art to its History  Discussion
15:15 Break
15:30 Johannes von Müller (London)  Repräsentation und Projektion. Bilder politischer Macht in   der deutschen Kunstgeschichte
15:50 Steffen Haug (London)   »… wie will man all diesen Blutgeruch aushalten?«:   Aby Warburg zwischen Patriotismus und kritischer Distanz   im Ersten Weltkrieg Response (Leena Crasemann, Hamburg) &

Discussion
16:45 Sanja Savkic (Berlin)  Art Historical Approaches to Mesoamerica: Obsolete, Toxic, or …? Response (Judith Rottenburg, Berlin) & Discussion
 
 
SATURDAY, 9TH NOVEMBER 2019 

II. TOXICITIES IN THE EXPANDED FIELD
 
10:15 Mingyuan Hu (Berlin)   Misnomers and Chinese Art Response (Felix Jäger, London) & Discussion
11:00 Alexandra Marraccini (London)   The Oozing Baroque in England Response (Anita Hosseini, London) & Discussion
11:45 Matthew Vollgraff (London)  Uncreative Evolution. Diffusionist Anthropology and its Objects Response (Oliver O’Donnell, London) & Discussion
12:30 Break
 
Closing Lecture
13:30 Matthew Rampley (Brno)   »But they had the right intentions.« On the point of   post-colonial critiques of art history Discussion
15:00 End
 
From racially and financially motivated scholarship to the pseudo-science of conspiracy theories, art historical boogeymen are ubiquitous. The discipline of art history has deep, potentially insever able, roots in explicitly nationalistic discourses and the relationships between art history and unsavoury  political regimes are written into the scholarly record. Quarantining art historical »contagion«, however, 
let alone inoculating the discipline against its past infections, is far from straightforward. Contagion as a metaphor is rich with value and has proven productive in certain historical moments.

Organised by Andreas Beyer, Alexandra Marraccini, Oliver O’Donnell, Judith Rottenburg

www.bilderfahrzeuge.org